CHM-131-160 Unit One

Matter
A substance that has mass and occupies volume with characteristic properties.
Law of Conservation of Matter
The total amount of materials present before a chemical reaction is the same as that present at the end of it.
“Matter can neither be created nor destroyed in a chemical reaction.”
Law of Conservation of Energy
The total energy of a system before a chemical reaction is the same as the total energy at the end of the reaction. It can transform but cannot disappear.
“Energy can neither be created nor destroyed.”
Characteristic Properties of Matter
mass, volume, density, temperature, reactivity, conductivity, color, etc.
Quantitative Properties
Measurements that have both a number and unit.

e.g. 12 grams

What is the SI unit for mass?
kilogram
kg
What is the SI unit for length?
meters
m
What is the SI unit for time?
second
s
What is the SI unit for temperature?
Kelvin
K
What is the SI unit for amount?
mole
mol
Giga
10^9
Mega
10^6
kilo
10^3
deci
10^-1
centi
10^-2
mili
10^-3
micro
10^-6
nano
10^-9
pico
10^-12
femto
10^-15
What is the SI unit for volume?
m^3
One cubic meter equals _____ liters?
1,000
One liter equals _____ cubic centimeters?
1,000
One mili liters equals _____ cubic centimeters?
1
One liter equals _____ deci meters?
1
What is absolute zero is…?
-273.15 degrees C or 0 K.
What is the equation to go from F to C ?
F = ( 9/5 C ) + 32
What is the equation to go from C to F ?
C = ( F – 32) 5/9
What is the equation for density?
D = M x V
What is the official SI unit for density?
kg/m^3
What are the two classifications for measurements?
exact and inexact
When adding and subtracting, how are the significant figures determined?
You ignore the places to the left of the decimal place. You then count the decimal places to the right of the decimal place and then take the smallest number. This is the number of significant figures behind the decimal.
When multiplying and dividing, how are the significant figures determined?
You count the sig figs in all the numbers and choose the least number.
Precision
How well measured quantities agree with each other.
Accuracy
How well measured quantities agree with the “true value.”