Introductory Chemistry

Lithium
Li+
Beryllium
Be2+
Nitrogen
N3-
Oxygen
O2-
Hydrogen
H
Magnesium
Mg2+
Sodium
Na+
Aluminum
Al3+
Silicon
Si2-
Fluorine
F
Chlorine
Cl
Potassium
K+
Calcium
Ca2+
Gallium
Ga3+
Selenium
Se2-
Bromine
Br
Rubidium
Rb+
Strontium
Sr2+
Indium
In3+
Tin
Sn2+
Tellurium
Te2-
Iodine
I
Cesium
Cs+
Barium
Ba2+
Thallium
Tl+, Tl3+
Bismuth
Bi3+
Lead
Pb2+
Mercury, Mercurous
Hg22+
Ammonium
NH4+
Cyanide
CN
Carbonate
CO32-
Hydrogen Carbonate
HCO3
Acetate
C2H3O2
Oxalate
C2O42-
Hypochlorite
ClO
Chlorite
ClO2
Chlorate
ClO3
Perchlorate
ClO4
Chromate
CrO42-
Dichromate
Cr2O72-
Permanganate
MnO4
Nitrite
NO2
Nitrate
NO3
Hydroxide
OH
Peroxide
O22-
Phosphate
PO43-
Monohydrogen phosphate
HPO42-
Dihydrogen phosphate
H2PO4
Sulfite
SO32-
Sulfate
SO42-

Hydrogen Sulfite 

(or bisulfite)

HSO3

Hydrogen sulfate

(or bisulfate)

HSO4
Thiosulfate
S2O32-
Solid
The form of matter which is rigid but not compressible
Liquid
The form of matter which is neither rigid nor compressible
Gas
The form of matter which is compressible but not rigid
Prefix mega-
106
Prefix kilo-
103
Prefix deci-
10-1
Prefix centi-
10-2
Prefix mili-
10-3
Prefix micro-
10-6
Prefix nano-
10-9
Prefix pico-
10-12
Dalton’s first postulate
All elements are made up of indivisible particles called atoms
Semimetals
Boron, Silicon, Germanium, Arsenic, Antimony, Tellurium, Astatine
Group
Periodic Table column
Period
Periodic Table row
Dalton’s second postulate
All atoms of one element are alike, but different from the atoms of all other elements
Dalton’s third postulate
Atoms are neither created nor destroyed during chemical reactions, they are simply rearranged.
Dalton’s fourth postulate
Compounds are made of atoms of different elements in specific ratios
Naming oxoacids
Change anion suffix (-ite to -ous or -ate to -ic) and add “acid”
Naming binary acids
non-aqueous: normal rules. aqueous: take stem of anion, add prefix hydro-, suffix -ic, and “acid”
Naming ionic compounds
metal name, add non-metal stem plus suffix -ide
Naming molecular compounds
Same as ionic, but use Greek number prefixes with element names if more than one atom of an element is present.
x

Hi!
I'm Larry

Hi there, would you like to get such a paper? How about receiving a customized one?

Check it out